Independence

Rights

The people you care and support have the same rights as anyone else living in society. It is important to acknowledge a person’s rights. For example, we all have the right to be part of a community, choose who are friends are, what we wish to wear, or what we want to eat, as well as the having the right to say no. Though it is important to acknowledge that all people have rights, you sometimes may need balance a person’s rights against what your responsibilities are as a support worker. For example, Neil, a person you support, is insisting he wants to keep his room door locked at all times and states it is his ‘right’ to privacy. He has already expressed his dissatisfaction with the number of people who come and go from his room. Despite his right to privacy, locking the door can have safety implications. In a situation like this you may suggest some alternative options. An example could be having a sign on the door, ‘please do not disturb’, which Neil could use when he feels like some privacy. If he rejects the choices you offer, you would then seek help and advice from your manager.

Independence

It is important that you, as a support worker, promote opportunities for a person to maintain independence on a day to day basis. This not only supports the person to be ‘actively’ involved in their care, but also increases their feeling of self-worth. Just because a person is reliant on support, does not mean they need to lose their independence totally. Your role is to be creative in finding ways that you can support a person to maintain or enhance their independence. An effective way to promote independence is to encourage a person to either start off or finish a task or give prompts throughout task. For example, a person with dementia may have forgotten how to dress themselves. In this situation you can prompt them to put on their shirt by giving short simple instructions, and then you can complete the task by doing up the buttons. For a person with a cognitive impairment, you may involve them in making a cup of tea, by encouraging them to finish the task of putting the milk into the cup. Having independence makes a person feel they have control in their life, helps them feel confident and fulfils their need of being able to participate in daily life.

Dignity and Respect

It is important to demonstrate respect towards a person you are supporting, by listening to them and honouring their values, choices and views. If a person is supported to live according to their own moral principles, they will maintain a sense of dignity. When a person feels they have been listened to, and taken seriously, they feel valued and worthy of respect. A feeling of self-respect is reflected in a person’s sense of identity.

Sense of self is also closely linked to our name and our appearance. It is important to be respectful and to address the person by the name they prefer. Some people are happy for their first name to be used, while others may prefer to be formally addressed as Mr or Mrs. Avoid pet names or generic terms like ‘dear’ or ‘love’ as this can be devaluing and also reduces a person’s sense of identity. Encourage a person to take pride in their presentation and compliment them on this. You can assist by offering choices of clothes, ensuring their clothes are clean and personal cares are completed.

Be kind and reassuring and do not speak down to the person. Ensure the language you use is positive and encouraging. Let the person do things at their own pace and in their own way, and give plenty of praise that is valuing and respectful. Be sensitive, compassionate and think about things from the person’s perspective.

Treat Me with Dignity

In memory of my dad who was unhappy in the care home he was in and I didn’t know enough then to help him) – Anon

I’m feeling down, I’m feeling low,

You say I’m going but I don’t want to go

I want some peace to enjoy what I like,

In my previous life I’d have gone for a hike.

But now you say that I’ve got to partake,

In bingo and singing, oh for heaven’s sake!

You bully me and make me feel small,

I hate it and you, I hate it all.

I want some respect, to be asked and be heard,

Not ordered about – it’s awful, absurd.

Have you heard the word dignity, do you know what it means, Individuals with feelings not human machines.

Help me to teach you about honour and pride, Empowerment’s another thing I’d like to guide.

I used to be tough and I used to be strong,

The fact that it’s diminished is sad and it’s wrong. You’re supposed to help me live life to its best, Instead I feel sorrow, not vigour and zest.

So treat me and others in a way that you’d want to be treated, Then folk like me won’t always feel cheated.

1. Why are person-centred values important in a person-centred approach to support? In the table below, describe the importance of five person-centred values in a person-centred approach to support.Person-centred values might include: • rights.• choice.• privacy.• independence.• dignity.• respect.• partnership.• or another value you identify yourself.

Task 2: Application of a person-centred approach

For this task, you need to show your understanding of the application of a person-centred approach.

5 How does your organisation apply a person-centred approach?In your answer you need to include the following information: • the process your organisation uses to identify a person’s history, preferences, wishes and needs.• your roles and responsibilities as a support worker in the application of a person-centred approach.• a description of the application of a person-centred approach in your organisation.You may include the following in the context of support:• service model and/or type.• organisation policies and procedures.• needs of the person being supported.• boundaries of role.• ethical responsibilities.• or other context of support you have identified.

Task 3: Apply a person-centred approach – verification

For this task, you need to demonstrate that you apply a person-centred approach when supporting a person and have this verified.

Complete all written tasks in this assessment before asking your verifier to complete the verification form. 

The verifier is likely to be your assessor, manager, supervisor or team leader. This must be a person who has observed your work over a period of time and can confirm that you complete the tasks to the standard required. Your assessor may contact your verifier to discuss their comments.  

Read the checklist so you know what is being verified.

1 Complete the table below with details of how you apply a person-centred approach

Provide a specific example of how you have applied the following person-centred values:

Continued next page

Individuality – 

Rights – 

Choice – 

Privacy –

Independence – 

Dignity – 

Respect – 

Partnership – 

Consent –

Give an example of feedback you have received. If possible include a positive and negative feedback example. 

What changes (if any) have you made to your support as a result of the feedback provided? Hide Files: A88F8B46-3F40-471B-9F89-7AC26482B796.jpegAACD4980-6550-403B-8259-C8ADB0989A36.jpegA27F5ABF-CDC9-4124-B60B-B3F5DC099F8B.jpeg48032864-07B2-483D-ACEE-4AA7B0CA7B8C.jpegB6A70F95-E463-45E7-B619-8E63A1DE827F.jpeg396304DA-6C50-4833-B09A-645EC8A11BA3.jpeg721211EB-62D3-4886-9634-7A644A45DA79.jpeg4917DEE5-A946-4168-901D-3516CA772AAE.jpeg9334DEA3-8065-412F-9F32-D92BBD24B869.jpegEFD1AB8F-78A2-4A07-B99F-0B9470A094E1.jpeg

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